The Left Hand of Mindfulness

Tonight I ate my dinner with chopsticks, using only my left hand. As a right-hander, this was no small feat, and involved some laborious maneuvering (especially when trying to pick up tiny softened garlic slices!). It wasn’t the result of a dare or bet, but rather a playful technique I use to practice mindfulness in a fun way. Instead of whipping out my phone to entertain myself as I ate alone, I brought myself into the present moment, quite forcefully, by making it impossible to trundle down the well beaten path of shoveling in the food mindlessly.

This is a general technique I try to employ often to trick my brain into being “in the now” – using my non-dominant hand to perform everyday tasks. Brushing teeth, using a computer mouse, or even just putting the keys in the opposite pocket. By doing an end-run around the habitual motor pathways, you make your brain focus on what it’s actually doing, instead of wandering off on some unnecessary tangent.

Aside from noticing that broccoli that has had a chance to sit in the stir fry juices for several days gets quite soft and quite scrumptious, I also learned that all of the advice I give to beginner chopstickers is generally good advice, but I expect them to pick it up way too fast. This is a common bias that I see all too often in other settings – experts expecting novices to pick up subtle nuances of expertise faster than they themselves did. It also reminded me of the importance of distinguishing knowledge from skill via that age-old bit of wisdom: practice, practice, practice.

I also had that wonderful child-like experience of discovering something for the first time again, of turning a meal into a little game, and a gentle grounding of myself back in my body as I tried to ward off the hand cramps. All of which I think is infinitely more important than the latest tweet from some venture capitalist I’ve never met and likely never will. Besides, the tweet can wait, but the broccoli won’t.

Mindfulness isn’t just about sitting still and watching your breath*. It’s about being here, now. Experiencing life in the real world, and not in your head. What can you do with your “other” hand?

* For a laugh, watch Eckhart Tolle’s imitation of formal meditation, 34 seconds into this video:

Author: Chris LuVogt

I am he as you are he as you are me and we are all together - Lennon & McCartney

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